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LEMMON HILL PLANTATION

 


Lemmon Hill Plantation is situated on a pre-revolutionary land grant given to a Mr. Trapp James and Mary Ann Lauderdale. Lemmon built this important classical home as the seat of their large plantation in western Fairfield County. Eventually, western Fairfield County became a bastion of gentility, grace and extreme wealth, second only to Charleston County, South Carolina. Numerous low country settlers moved inland from the coast to claim large plantations among Fairfield Countyís fertile valleys. 

Among these early pre-revolutionary war settlers were the French Huguenots. These French Huguenots brought with them their lust for elegant and refined living. This is reflected in the architectural treasures that remain here. Lemmon Hill is constructed of pit-sawn timber, a technique that was already out of favor in Charleston by the 1750ís, clad with beaded clapboards rarely seen in the state of South Carolina after 1800. Under the backside wing of this home remains a log-constructed springhouse for storing dairy and produce, keeping the precious food stuffs from spoiling. The interior of this home exhibits craftsmanship rarely seen outside of the lowcountry. The door facings are finely gouged which surround elegant six panel doors of the cross and bible design, a testament of the buildersí Christian beliefs. In the drawing room, the wainscoting is exquisitely grain painted to resemble birdís eye maple and the door backs are comb painted to imitate the grain of mahogany. One of the upstairs bedroomís ceiling is flamed decorated, a technique that exists in only one other known house in the state. Several rooms still retain their indigo as well as milk paint coverings. The kitchen yard includes a slave cabin which housed the family cook, a well house, smokehouse and a chicken house. These were kept close to the house for safe keeping. The original front yard remains enclosed by the native granite fence post. The original Winnsboro-Newberry road, now SC HWY 34 runs just to the North side of the front fence and can be traced across the plantation from Little River. This plantation and its outbuildings have been preserved, restored and are owned by Mr. & Mrs. Charles D Corley.

GALLERY
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CONTACT

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   Be Sure to visit The Charleston Silver Lady and Corley Hall 

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